How To
16 min read

How to Manage a Hybrid Team Successfully

Soniya Jain

October 26, 2022

In this guide, we'll discuss how to manage a hybrid team that includes both in-office and remote employees so that everyone can work together effectively. We'll cover some of the challenges you may face with a hybrid team and offer strategies for overcoming them.

The biggest change from the pandemic was the shift to the hybrid model, where everyone could choose to work anywhere they wanted.

It gave employees a sense of empowerment and control over their time and allowed them to manage their lives better.

In a recent survey of 100 executives across different industries and geographies, 90% said they planned to combine remote and on-site work.

hybrid workforce survey

Image Source

While this is a significant shift, it also introduces some challenges—diluted culture, an ineffective structure, and trouble keeping projects moving forward.

Managers must be organized to stay in sync with the rest of their team in a hybrid workplace. A lot falls on your shoulders, from planning who's going to what meeting and asking for people's availability to keeping tabs on important documents and files for projects.

Here are several tips for managing a hybrid team, combining remote workers and hybrid employees into one happy, cohesive unit.

What is a hybrid work model?

A hybrid work model is one in which some employees are primarily remote, others primarily on-site, and others split their time between both.

The idea behind hybrid work models is that they allow organizations to take advantage of virtual collaboration and physical co-location. They also allow organizations to scale up or down without investing in new buildings or equipment.

Hybrid models often allow employees to choose when, where, and how they work, giving them more control over their schedules and eliminating the need for travel or office space.

These flexible work arrangements help companies attract top talent and save on overhead costs while providing employees with a better work-life balance.

hybrid working workplace

Image Source

Challenges of managing a hybrid team

Hybrid teams can be very effective—but they also pose challenges. The fact that everyone isn't in one building means that there's less direct interaction than in an all-in-one meeting room. 

As many employees might be working from home at different times, it's easy for people to get off track and lose sight of the goals they set out to achieve when they first started working together.

Here are some common challenges that you may face when managing a hybrid team.

Us versus them

The most common challenge is the "us versus them" mentality. Employees who work in-house can feel like they're part of a club that others don't have access to, and remote workers can feel left out and isolated. It is a dangerous mindset that can lead to resentment and undermine the collaborative environment you're trying to create.

Undercurrent among colleagues

As remote workers aren't present in person at all times, it can be harder for them to build relationships with their co-workers. This can create an undercurrent among colleagues who feel they don't know each other well.

Lack of communication and coordination

Hybrid teams can have difficulty communicating because they're not working in the same office. This can make it harder for them to get things done on time or even know what each other is doing if they don’t have project management software for team collaboration. 

To address this challenge, you must ensure your team has effective communication tools, like video conferencing or messaging apps, in place so they can easily stay in touch with each other as needed.

Proximity bias

The proximity bias refers to the tendency for people to form stronger relationships with those nearby. If you have all your colleagues in one place, developing closer relationships with them is more accessible.

But if your team is split between locations or a hybrid office, this proximity bias can make it harder for people to form strong relationships with each other. You might not see each other as often or be able to spend quite as much time together. This can mean that your employees don't feel like they know each other as well, which could prevent them from working together as effectively.

Lack of collective creativity

In-person brainstorming sessions are an effective way for teams to develop new ideas and solve problems together. However, when everyone works in different places, it can be harder for them to collaborate on projects in a virtual meeting. They don't have time to meet up and discuss ideas face-to-face, making it challenging to build relationships that lead to great ideas and innovations.

Dilution of company culture

When employees are spread across multiple locations, it's hard to foster a sense of shared identity and values in your organization—no matter how much you try! A remote workforce may become less aligned with your business goals and mission than an on-site team, making it more difficult for everyone involved to achieve results together as one unit rather than as individuals.

The lack of physical interaction can also decrease overall employee morale and happiness, which could hurt your company's culture.

Conflict between remote workers and their managers

In-office employees often have more direct access to their managers than remote workers, which can lead to frustrations if they feel like their managers aren't available when they need them most. You can avoid this by ensuring your remote employees feel like they're part of the team by meeting with them regularly and making yourself available for questions whenever necessary.

How do you manage a hybrid team effectively?

Managing hybrid teams is no easy feat. It's a balancing act that requires you to be flexible and think outside the box.

As a manager, you must create an inclusive hybrid environment where everyone feels valued and included, no matter where they are working from or what role they have within the business. 

To do this effectively, here are some tips on leading hybrid teams.

Offer support

When creating an on-site hybrid team, offering your full support is important.

Some people are apprehensive about returning to the office; others may feel that working from home gives them an advantage. You must address these concerns and ensure the whole team feels supported and empowered.

According to Linda Hill, a professor at Harvard Business School, "Allow people to admit how they're feeling" and give them space to "open up about their anxieties."

The key is understanding what each needs and ensuring they have what they need to succeed at work—whether allowing them to work remotely or providing them with an office space at headquarters where they can come in every day.

You can get a sense of this by checking in with people regularly and asking them questions like these.

  • Do they enjoy working from home?
  • Do they miss being around other people when they're working?
  • What kind of support do they need from their manager?

It will help you better understand what your team needs and how best to support them.

Set clear goals, expectations, and responsibilities

The best way to ensure a positive experience for everyone in a hybrid work environment is to set clear goals and accountability. You don't want to micromanage your employees, but you must know what they're working on, how they're doing, and where you can help them achieve their goals.

Here are some tips to help your team get back on track.

Set clear goals

Everyone knows what's expected of them and how their performance will be measured. Then, set deadlines for achieving each goal and share them with everyone on the team. This will help keep your team focused as it works toward its goals.

Use peer reviews

A good way to get feedback from your team members is by asking them to give each other peer reviews. This will help them learn how others see them and how they can improve on any weaknesses or areas for improvement identified during the process.

Know their responsibilities

You should consider using a tool that allows you to share tasks and set reminders with your team members (if you don’t already) so that no one falls through the cracks when it comes time for a follow-up on specific tasks or projects they're working on together.

Make sure everyone knows their role on the team, including what they're responsible for and how their work contributes to the overall mission.

Provide access to the right tools

As a manager, it's your job to ensure that all your team members have what they need to perform well. This includes things like the right equipment and software.

Ensuring that each member of your team has access to the right tools is essential for several reasons.

  • It ensures that everyone knows what's going on with their projects and those of their colleagues and managers.
  • It allows each team member to keep up with their responsibilities and stay informed about deadlines and other key dates.
  • It helps prevent confusion when two people use different methods of communication, email versus instant messaging.
  • It prevents duplication of effort by ensuring that each member knows what others are doing.

Make sure your hybrid team members have access to a variety of tools. This includes things like project management software, video conferencing, collaboration software, and online storage solutions. If your organization uses one particular tool, ensure other team members know how to use it.

Remember that not all tools are created equal; each offers different features and benefits that may be more or less useful depending on your needs.

Schedule regular team retreats

One of the most important things you can do to ensure your hybrid team is working well is to get them together physically. This is how you'll build trust, establish relationships, and collaborate on projects.

This doesn't have to be expensive or time-consuming. There are lots of ways to do it without breaking the bank. 

Here are a few ideas for having retreats that develop team culture.

Schedule monthly meetings at the office

Hold regular meetings at the office at least once a month, if possible. You don't have to meet every day or every week; make sure that there is at least one meeting per month where everyone comes together physically so they can interact face-to-face.

Host team lunches

Another way of getting people together is by hosting lunch events at least once every quarter or twice per year, depending on how frequently your organization has regular meetings. 

These lunch events can be held in your office or at a nearby restaurant and should be designed to foster team bonding. Use this opportunity to discuss projects, collaborate on ideas, and build relationships with your remote workers.

Organize a company-wide event

It's a tradition in many companies for everyone to come together for a social event at the end of the year. You can go on a retreat at least once a year where everyone can get away from their screens and work together in person on projects that are important to you and your business.

Creating occasions to bring your hybrid team together increases collaboration and produces stronger relationships.

Make rewards and benefits fair for everyone

Since your team is a mix of remote and in-house employees, the way you communicate with them, the benefits you offer, and the incentives you use will be different.

To ensure rewards and benefits are fair for your hybrid team, set up a reward program based on what works best for everyone. Then, ensure your company culture is aligned with your rewards program.

For example, if you offer an extra day off for all employees who hit their performance goals, ensure it's something that you can apply equally across all locations.

While it's exciting for a manager to see one of their employees win an award, awarding prizes like this can be disastrous if you don't consider how your other team members will react.

If you're managing employees from different locations, you'll want to ensure that everyone is on board with the reward system and understands how it works. 

Here are some ways to make sure everyone gets the same treatment.

Give everyone the same opportunity for rewards

If you have a "lunch with the CEO" contest for your in-house employees, ensure there's also an equivalent contest for remote workers so they have an equal chance of winning. If you have something like an annual employee survey that allows everyone to win gift cards or free lunches, don't forget about those who work from home!

Be transparent about how rewards are distributed

Let everyone know how many points they need to earn a prize before choosing who wins each time. While celebrating wins is important, you also must help the group understand what they did correctly, and what they need to change when they lose.

Your employees are part of a team, so rewarding them collectively is the best way to encourage them to work together.

Measure performance in a fair way

The most important thing to consider when measuring performance is fairness and consistency in your approach.

If you use KPIs (key performance indicators) to measure performance, they must be relevant and appropriate to your business model. If you don't understand what drives success within your company, it will be impossible to measure performance effectively.

Use multiple metrics when evaluating performance. Don't just use one metric, such as the number of hours worked or tasks completed, because it can lead to unfairness when applied to different people with different jobs and responsibilities in your organization. Consider using a combination of metrics that can apply to your entire team of hybrid workers.

If you don't measure performance fairly, it could create resentment and conflict among the team members. It may also cause some people to feel like they're not doing their share of the work or being recognized for what they do.

Be attentive to how you communicate

Managers and employees must be mindful of communication when working with a hybrid team, which can make or break their success.

In-office meetings are the most critical form of communication for many teams, but they can be problematic when working with remote staff. Therefore, managers should avoid impromptu in-office meetings that do not include all team members.

Instead, managers should schedule regular virtual meetings for productivity via video chat or conference call to ensure everyone has an opportunity to contribute and participate. This also allows teams to use their time more efficiently by avoiding lengthy stand-ups or group chats that they could conduct remotely.

Set priorities with flexibility

When setting priorities for your team, you may be tempted to set them in stone. But as a hybrid team leader, you should know that flexibility is key.

A clear sense of priorities will ensure that everyone on your team knows what is most important.

Here are some ways you can set priorities without being too rigid.

Establish expectations about working hours and deadlines early on

When setting priorities for a remote team, it's important to have clear deadlines so everyone knows what they should be working on at any time. This could mean having weekly meetings or group chats where you review what needs to be done and assign tasks accordingly. You may also want to use an online project management tool so your virtual team can see every step of the process. 

At least once weekly, check in with each remote or hybrid employee individually to ensure they understand their responsibilities and provide support if needed.

Make sure everyone understands that they won't be expected to work 24/7 or during weekends if they aren't compensated for overtime or weekend hours.

Define job responsibilities clearly

Everyone needs to know where they stand in relation to one another and what each person needs from them as a manager or colleague. It will help prevent conflicts later when people get confused about their roles and responsibilities within your organization (which happens more often than you think).

Give your team members flexibility

Show your team some leeway in how they approach their work. You don't need to micromanage every aspect of their job. Instead, ask them to keep you updated on significant projects and let them know when things are going well so that you can provide feedback or offer suggestions for improvement.

When you work with a group of people who aren't in the same room, it's easy for priorities to get lost in translation. You need to set clear priorities so everyone knows what's essential and how they can contribute to the overall effort.

Bring playfulness into the workday

When it comes to hybrid teams, getting caught up in the business side of things is easy. You want your employees to be productive and efficient, so you're focused on ensuring they have everything they need.

As your remote team members are spread worldwide, getting everyone together for an office happy hour or an after-work social event can be challenging. That doesn't mean you shouldn't try, though! If you want your team members to feel like they're part of your company culture, you have to bring fun into the workday.

Here are some ideas that will help you incorporate fun into your hybrid team.

Host a game night

Whether you're playing cards or board games, game night is a great way for employees to unwind after a long day. You can even make this event virtual, where everyone can play their favorite games together online.

Have a theme day

Organize events such as "dress up like your favorite superhero" or "dress up like your favorite book character." It could be something that everyone participates in. It's a great way to get people out of their shells and have fun.

Make sure that whatever activity you choose, everyone can participate and is given equal opportunities. This way, everyone will have a great time, and you won't have a situation where some people are left out.

Be patient

Managing a hybrid team is a challenge. You have to ensure everyone is on the same page and that they're all working together.

Getting everyone comfortable with the new hybrid workplace can be complicated, even if you have done everything right in managing a hybrid team. So be patient and let the team come together.

Here are some things to keep in mind when managing a hybrid team.

Give your team time to adjust. If your company has been around for years and you've always worked in an office environment, this type of transition may feel strange at first.

Remember that your employees have been used to doing things their way for years, so it's natural for them to be hesitant about changing their habits now.

Know when to adapt or change things up as needed. You may need to adapt to certain aspects of your company's culture to accommodate employees who prefer remote work.

You might also need to change how often you meet face-to-face or communicate via email versus phone calls versus texts. These changes will be different for every organization and employee, but they're essential nonetheless!

Final thoughts on managing hybrid teams effectively

When managing a hybrid team, the key is to create clear expectations for each role. To do this, it's essential to identify your company's core values and then align those values with the skill sets of each employee. It will help you build a high-performance team that can respond flexibly to change while ensuring everyone has an opportunity to contribute at work.

How To
16 min read

How to Manage a Hybrid Team Successfully

Soniya Jain
October 26, 2022

In this guide, we'll discuss how to manage a hybrid team that includes both in-office and remote employees so that everyone can work together effectively. We'll cover some of the challenges you may face with a hybrid team and offer strategies for overcoming them.

The biggest change from the pandemic was the shift to the hybrid model, where everyone could choose to work anywhere they wanted.

It gave employees a sense of empowerment and control over their time and allowed them to manage their lives better.

In a recent survey of 100 executives across different industries and geographies, 90% said they planned to combine remote and on-site work.

hybrid workforce survey

Image Source

While this is a significant shift, it also introduces some challenges—diluted culture, an ineffective structure, and trouble keeping projects moving forward.

Managers must be organized to stay in sync with the rest of their team in a hybrid workplace. A lot falls on your shoulders, from planning who's going to what meeting and asking for people's availability to keeping tabs on important documents and files for projects.

Here are several tips for managing a hybrid team, combining remote workers and hybrid employees into one happy, cohesive unit.

What is a hybrid work model?

A hybrid work model is one in which some employees are primarily remote, others primarily on-site, and others split their time between both.

The idea behind hybrid work models is that they allow organizations to take advantage of virtual collaboration and physical co-location. They also allow organizations to scale up or down without investing in new buildings or equipment.

Hybrid models often allow employees to choose when, where, and how they work, giving them more control over their schedules and eliminating the need for travel or office space.

These flexible work arrangements help companies attract top talent and save on overhead costs while providing employees with a better work-life balance.

hybrid working workplace

Image Source

Challenges of managing a hybrid team

Hybrid teams can be very effective—but they also pose challenges. The fact that everyone isn't in one building means that there's less direct interaction than in an all-in-one meeting room. 

As many employees might be working from home at different times, it's easy for people to get off track and lose sight of the goals they set out to achieve when they first started working together.

Here are some common challenges that you may face when managing a hybrid team.

Us versus them

The most common challenge is the "us versus them" mentality. Employees who work in-house can feel like they're part of a club that others don't have access to, and remote workers can feel left out and isolated. It is a dangerous mindset that can lead to resentment and undermine the collaborative environment you're trying to create.

Undercurrent among colleagues

As remote workers aren't present in person at all times, it can be harder for them to build relationships with their co-workers. This can create an undercurrent among colleagues who feel they don't know each other well.

Lack of communication and coordination

Hybrid teams can have difficulty communicating because they're not working in the same office. This can make it harder for them to get things done on time or even know what each other is doing if they don’t have project management software for team collaboration. 

To address this challenge, you must ensure your team has effective communication tools, like video conferencing or messaging apps, in place so they can easily stay in touch with each other as needed.

Proximity bias

The proximity bias refers to the tendency for people to form stronger relationships with those nearby. If you have all your colleagues in one place, developing closer relationships with them is more accessible.

But if your team is split between locations or a hybrid office, this proximity bias can make it harder for people to form strong relationships with each other. You might not see each other as often or be able to spend quite as much time together. This can mean that your employees don't feel like they know each other as well, which could prevent them from working together as effectively.

Lack of collective creativity

In-person brainstorming sessions are an effective way for teams to develop new ideas and solve problems together. However, when everyone works in different places, it can be harder for them to collaborate on projects in a virtual meeting. They don't have time to meet up and discuss ideas face-to-face, making it challenging to build relationships that lead to great ideas and innovations.

Dilution of company culture

When employees are spread across multiple locations, it's hard to foster a sense of shared identity and values in your organization—no matter how much you try! A remote workforce may become less aligned with your business goals and mission than an on-site team, making it more difficult for everyone involved to achieve results together as one unit rather than as individuals.

The lack of physical interaction can also decrease overall employee morale and happiness, which could hurt your company's culture.

Conflict between remote workers and their managers

In-office employees often have more direct access to their managers than remote workers, which can lead to frustrations if they feel like their managers aren't available when they need them most. You can avoid this by ensuring your remote employees feel like they're part of the team by meeting with them regularly and making yourself available for questions whenever necessary.

How do you manage a hybrid team effectively?

Managing hybrid teams is no easy feat. It's a balancing act that requires you to be flexible and think outside the box.

As a manager, you must create an inclusive hybrid environment where everyone feels valued and included, no matter where they are working from or what role they have within the business. 

To do this effectively, here are some tips on leading hybrid teams.

Offer support

When creating an on-site hybrid team, offering your full support is important.

Some people are apprehensive about returning to the office; others may feel that working from home gives them an advantage. You must address these concerns and ensure the whole team feels supported and empowered.

According to Linda Hill, a professor at Harvard Business School, "Allow people to admit how they're feeling" and give them space to "open up about their anxieties."

The key is understanding what each needs and ensuring they have what they need to succeed at work—whether allowing them to work remotely or providing them with an office space at headquarters where they can come in every day.

You can get a sense of this by checking in with people regularly and asking them questions like these.

  • Do they enjoy working from home?
  • Do they miss being around other people when they're working?
  • What kind of support do they need from their manager?

It will help you better understand what your team needs and how best to support them.

Set clear goals, expectations, and responsibilities

The best way to ensure a positive experience for everyone in a hybrid work environment is to set clear goals and accountability. You don't want to micromanage your employees, but you must know what they're working on, how they're doing, and where you can help them achieve their goals.

Here are some tips to help your team get back on track.

Set clear goals

Everyone knows what's expected of them and how their performance will be measured. Then, set deadlines for achieving each goal and share them with everyone on the team. This will help keep your team focused as it works toward its goals.

Use peer reviews

A good way to get feedback from your team members is by asking them to give each other peer reviews. This will help them learn how others see them and how they can improve on any weaknesses or areas for improvement identified during the process.

Know their responsibilities

You should consider using a tool that allows you to share tasks and set reminders with your team members (if you don’t already) so that no one falls through the cracks when it comes time for a follow-up on specific tasks or projects they're working on together.

Make sure everyone knows their role on the team, including what they're responsible for and how their work contributes to the overall mission.

Provide access to the right tools

As a manager, it's your job to ensure that all your team members have what they need to perform well. This includes things like the right equipment and software.

Ensuring that each member of your team has access to the right tools is essential for several reasons.

  • It ensures that everyone knows what's going on with their projects and those of their colleagues and managers.
  • It allows each team member to keep up with their responsibilities and stay informed about deadlines and other key dates.
  • It helps prevent confusion when two people use different methods of communication, email versus instant messaging.
  • It prevents duplication of effort by ensuring that each member knows what others are doing.

Make sure your hybrid team members have access to a variety of tools. This includes things like project management software, video conferencing, collaboration software, and online storage solutions. If your organization uses one particular tool, ensure other team members know how to use it.

Remember that not all tools are created equal; each offers different features and benefits that may be more or less useful depending on your needs.

Schedule regular team retreats

One of the most important things you can do to ensure your hybrid team is working well is to get them together physically. This is how you'll build trust, establish relationships, and collaborate on projects.

This doesn't have to be expensive or time-consuming. There are lots of ways to do it without breaking the bank. 

Here are a few ideas for having retreats that develop team culture.

Schedule monthly meetings at the office

Hold regular meetings at the office at least once a month, if possible. You don't have to meet every day or every week; make sure that there is at least one meeting per month where everyone comes together physically so they can interact face-to-face.

Host team lunches

Another way of getting people together is by hosting lunch events at least once every quarter or twice per year, depending on how frequently your organization has regular meetings. 

These lunch events can be held in your office or at a nearby restaurant and should be designed to foster team bonding. Use this opportunity to discuss projects, collaborate on ideas, and build relationships with your remote workers.

Organize a company-wide event

It's a tradition in many companies for everyone to come together for a social event at the end of the year. You can go on a retreat at least once a year where everyone can get away from their screens and work together in person on projects that are important to you and your business.

Creating occasions to bring your hybrid team together increases collaboration and produces stronger relationships.

Make rewards and benefits fair for everyone

Since your team is a mix of remote and in-house employees, the way you communicate with them, the benefits you offer, and the incentives you use will be different.

To ensure rewards and benefits are fair for your hybrid team, set up a reward program based on what works best for everyone. Then, ensure your company culture is aligned with your rewards program.

For example, if you offer an extra day off for all employees who hit their performance goals, ensure it's something that you can apply equally across all locations.

While it's exciting for a manager to see one of their employees win an award, awarding prizes like this can be disastrous if you don't consider how your other team members will react.

If you're managing employees from different locations, you'll want to ensure that everyone is on board with the reward system and understands how it works. 

Here are some ways to make sure everyone gets the same treatment.

Give everyone the same opportunity for rewards

If you have a "lunch with the CEO" contest for your in-house employees, ensure there's also an equivalent contest for remote workers so they have an equal chance of winning. If you have something like an annual employee survey that allows everyone to win gift cards or free lunches, don't forget about those who work from home!

Be transparent about how rewards are distributed

Let everyone know how many points they need to earn a prize before choosing who wins each time. While celebrating wins is important, you also must help the group understand what they did correctly, and what they need to change when they lose.

Your employees are part of a team, so rewarding them collectively is the best way to encourage them to work together.

Measure performance in a fair way

The most important thing to consider when measuring performance is fairness and consistency in your approach.

If you use KPIs (key performance indicators) to measure performance, they must be relevant and appropriate to your business model. If you don't understand what drives success within your company, it will be impossible to measure performance effectively.

Use multiple metrics when evaluating performance. Don't just use one metric, such as the number of hours worked or tasks completed, because it can lead to unfairness when applied to different people with different jobs and responsibilities in your organization. Consider using a combination of metrics that can apply to your entire team of hybrid workers.

If you don't measure performance fairly, it could create resentment and conflict among the team members. It may also cause some people to feel like they're not doing their share of the work or being recognized for what they do.

Be attentive to how you communicate

Managers and employees must be mindful of communication when working with a hybrid team, which can make or break their success.

In-office meetings are the most critical form of communication for many teams, but they can be problematic when working with remote staff. Therefore, managers should avoid impromptu in-office meetings that do not include all team members.

Instead, managers should schedule regular virtual meetings for productivity via video chat or conference call to ensure everyone has an opportunity to contribute and participate. This also allows teams to use their time more efficiently by avoiding lengthy stand-ups or group chats that they could conduct remotely.

Set priorities with flexibility

When setting priorities for your team, you may be tempted to set them in stone. But as a hybrid team leader, you should know that flexibility is key.

A clear sense of priorities will ensure that everyone on your team knows what is most important.

Here are some ways you can set priorities without being too rigid.

Establish expectations about working hours and deadlines early on

When setting priorities for a remote team, it's important to have clear deadlines so everyone knows what they should be working on at any time. This could mean having weekly meetings or group chats where you review what needs to be done and assign tasks accordingly. You may also want to use an online project management tool so your virtual team can see every step of the process. 

At least once weekly, check in with each remote or hybrid employee individually to ensure they understand their responsibilities and provide support if needed.

Make sure everyone understands that they won't be expected to work 24/7 or during weekends if they aren't compensated for overtime or weekend hours.

Define job responsibilities clearly

Everyone needs to know where they stand in relation to one another and what each person needs from them as a manager or colleague. It will help prevent conflicts later when people get confused about their roles and responsibilities within your organization (which happens more often than you think).

Give your team members flexibility

Show your team some leeway in how they approach their work. You don't need to micromanage every aspect of their job. Instead, ask them to keep you updated on significant projects and let them know when things are going well so that you can provide feedback or offer suggestions for improvement.

When you work with a group of people who aren't in the same room, it's easy for priorities to get lost in translation. You need to set clear priorities so everyone knows what's essential and how they can contribute to the overall effort.

Bring playfulness into the workday

When it comes to hybrid teams, getting caught up in the business side of things is easy. You want your employees to be productive and efficient, so you're focused on ensuring they have everything they need.

As your remote team members are spread worldwide, getting everyone together for an office happy hour or an after-work social event can be challenging. That doesn't mean you shouldn't try, though! If you want your team members to feel like they're part of your company culture, you have to bring fun into the workday.

Here are some ideas that will help you incorporate fun into your hybrid team.

Host a game night

Whether you're playing cards or board games, game night is a great way for employees to unwind after a long day. You can even make this event virtual, where everyone can play their favorite games together online.

Have a theme day

Organize events such as "dress up like your favorite superhero" or "dress up like your favorite book character." It could be something that everyone participates in. It's a great way to get people out of their shells and have fun.

Make sure that whatever activity you choose, everyone can participate and is given equal opportunities. This way, everyone will have a great time, and you won't have a situation where some people are left out.

Be patient

Managing a hybrid team is a challenge. You have to ensure everyone is on the same page and that they're all working together.

Getting everyone comfortable with the new hybrid workplace can be complicated, even if you have done everything right in managing a hybrid team. So be patient and let the team come together.

Here are some things to keep in mind when managing a hybrid team.

Give your team time to adjust. If your company has been around for years and you've always worked in an office environment, this type of transition may feel strange at first.

Remember that your employees have been used to doing things their way for years, so it's natural for them to be hesitant about changing their habits now.

Know when to adapt or change things up as needed. You may need to adapt to certain aspects of your company's culture to accommodate employees who prefer remote work.

You might also need to change how often you meet face-to-face or communicate via email versus phone calls versus texts. These changes will be different for every organization and employee, but they're essential nonetheless!

Final thoughts on managing hybrid teams effectively

When managing a hybrid team, the key is to create clear expectations for each role. To do this, it's essential to identify your company's core values and then align those values with the skill sets of each employee. It will help you build a high-performance team that can respond flexibly to change while ensuring everyone has an opportunity to contribute at work.

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